Impressive sea trials complete refit of Ciao

01 jun 2018

The five-month refit project of Ciao (ex. Nilo), built by Moonen Shipyard, has been successfully completed with sea trials off the coast of Holland. The new CMC zero-speed stabilisers worked very well both in choppy waves and at anchor. The extensive maintenance and service on Ciao’s propulsion drive and Servogear controllable pitch propeller system also paid dividends, with the yacht hitting a top speed of 23.7 knots on her first sea trial day.

“It’s impressive that a displacement yacht can manage almost 24 knots,” says captain Henk-Johan Hankart. “All the work on the propoulsion line was done very well during the refit, and we felt that during the sea trials. Ciao was already a very stable boat even before we made this switch from hydraulic to electrical stabilisation. We sailed to Holland from Greece last November and the weather in the Atlantic was quite bad at times. As Ciao took the waves in her stride, I remember the words of one of those who joined us on the delivery, a captain on offshore vessels: ‘I feel safer on this yacht than on the boats we use for the wind farms’, he said.”

Captain Hankart, who has been at the helm of Ciao since 2015, says he received a warm welcome upon arrival. “The yard had arranged for us to be a ‘ship in transit’, which has had clear tax benefits for this project. The mechanical work was very good and the workers on the shop floor were helpful and easy-going. A special thanks to Jeroen and Wim for all their support.

“During the refit we took all the propeller shafts out to replace the bearings and found some damage to the strut which was expertly repaired. The new crew cabin is a very nice addition to the yacht which will make our lives more comfortable. And we also found Den Bosch to be a good place to live, with easy access to both the yard and further afield.”

Ciao is now setting off for a short tour of the waters in and around the Netherlands. Captain Hankart and his crew will then head off with the owner to Denmark followed by a summer season in the Baltic. If you would like to know more about this project you can read the previous Moonen Journal on the subject here.